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Tango is a sad thought that is danced.Enrique Santos Discépolothink & dancemore quotes

EMBO Practical Course: Bioinformatics and Genome Analysis, 5–17 June 2017.


art + literature

daily quotation server archives

In the late 90’s I started (a good decade for starts) a daily quotation server project at www.quoteserver.ca. The domain is now defunct—some pages are partially viewable at the Way Back Machine.

Below is the list of quotes I had collected by the end of the life of the project. Most are about love—duh—and a few are jolly jests from funny trenches. You know, that place where mustard gas makes your eyes water.

The quotes weren’t scraped from quote archives—each is meaningful and hand-picked.

the quote archive

And now for full list of 1,600 other things worth reading. Such as everything Dorothy Parker has written and ... yes, even the Pinky and Brain quotes, which are a special kind of special.

Quote collections about love, heart, desire, life, death, god, mind, science.

Feeling lucky? Read 10 random quotes. Well, will you, punk?

Quotes about love

14
Love seeketh not itself to please,
Nor for itself hath any care,
But for another gives its ease,
And builds a Heaven in Hell’s despair.
William Blake
The Clod and the Pebble
15
Love seeketh only self to please,
To bind another to its delight,
Joys in another’s loss of ease,
And builds a Hell in Heaven’s despite.
William Blake
The Clod and the Pebble
31
Never seek to tell thy love,
Love that never told can be;
For the gentle wind does move
Silently, invisibly.
William Blake
Love’s Secret
36
The mind has a thousand eyes,
And the heart but one;
Yet the light of a whole life dies,
When love is done.
Francis Bourdillon
Light
38
So sweet love seemed that April morn.
When first we kissed beside the thorn,
So strangely sweet, it was not strange
We thought that love could never change.
Robert Seymour Bridges
So Sweet Love Seemed
39
But I can tell—let truth be told—
That love will change in growing old;
Though day by day is nought to see,
So delicate his motions be.
Robert Seymour Bridges
So Sweet Love Seemed
41
When first we met we did not guess
That Love would prove so hard a master.
Robert Seymour Bridges
Triolet
44
I do not love thee, Doctor Fell,
The reason why I cannot tell;
But this alone I know full well,
I do not love thee, Doctor Fell.
Thomas Brown
47
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breath and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Sonnets from the Portuguese
48
I love thee with the love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Sonnets from the Portuguese
57
My days are in the yellow leaf;
The flowers and fruits of love are gone;
The worm, the canker, and the grief
Are mine alone.
George Gordon Byron
On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year
76
Love in her sunny eyes doth basking play;
Love walk the pleasant mazes of her hair;
Love does on both her lips for ever stray,
And sows and reaps a thousand kisses there:
In all her outward parts Love’s always seen;
But oh! he never went within.
Abraham Cowley
The Change
106
Why are her eyes so bright, so bright,
Why do her lips control
The kisses of a summer night
When I would love her soul?
Richard Barham Middleton
Any Lover, Any Lass
107
There’s a Friend for little children
Above the bright blue sky,
A Friend who never changes,
Whose love can never die.
Albert Midlane
Hymn
121
My heart is like a singing bird
Whose nest is in a watered shoot;
My heart is like an apple-tree
Whose boughs are bend with thick-set fruit;
My heart is like a rainbow shell
That paddles in a halcyon sea;
My heart is gladder than all these
Because my love is come to me.
Christina Georgina Rossetti
A Birthday
122
Because the birthday of my life
Is come, my love is come to me.
Christina Georgina Rossetti
A Birthday
126
Doubt the stars are fire;
Doubt that the sun doth move;
Doubt truth to be a liar;
But never doubt I love.
William Shakespeare
Hamlet, II.ii.116
139
Noir comme le diable,
Chaud comme l’enfer,
Pur comme un ange,
Doux comme l’amour.
[Black like the devil,
Hot like hell,
Pure like an angel,
Soft like love.]
Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord
Recipe for coffee
155
If my dear, you seek to slumber
Count of stars an endless number;
If you still continue wakeful,
Count the drops that make a lakeful;
Then if vigilance yet above you
Hover, count the times I love you;
And if slumber still repel you
Count the times I do not tell you.
Franklin P. Holans
174
I’m not a vegetarian because I love animals;
I’m a vegetarian because I hate plants.
A. Whitney Brown
272
Love comes unseen, we only see it go.
408
I love mankind; it’s people I can’t stand.
Charles Schultz
415
Love is like an hourglass, with the heart filling up as the brain empties.
Jules Renard
436
Love is a word that is constantly heard,
Hate is a word that is not.
Love, I am told, is more precious than gold.
Love, I have read, is hot.
But hate is the verb that to me is superb,
And Love but a drug on the mart.
Any kiddie in school can love like a fool,
But Hating, my boy, is an Art.
Ogden Nash
452
God must love stupid people, He made so many of them.
503
It is impossible to love and be wise.
Francis Bacon
516
Love looks through a telescope; envy, through a microscope.
Josh Billings
542
Men always want to be a woman’s first love—women like to be a man’s last romance.
Oscar Wilde
576
Love’s the only engine of survival.
Leonard Cohen
The Future
579
I love the country but I can’t stand the scene.
Leonard Cohen
Democracy
601
In all thy humours, whether grave or mellow,
Thou’rt such a touchy, testy, pleasant fellow;
Hast so much wit, and mirth, and spleen about thee,
There is no loving with thee, nor without thee.
Joseph Addison
The Spectator, 68
608
Love me little, love me long,
Is the burden of my song.’,
612
There is a lady sweet and kind,
Was never a face so pleased my mind;
I did but see her passing by,
And yet I love her till I die.
614
L’amour est aveugle; l’amitie ferme les yeux.
[Love is blind; friendship closes its eyes.]
624
I’ll love you till the ocean
Is folded and hung up to dry
And the seven stars to squawking
Like geese about the sky.
W.H. Auden
As I Walked Out One Evening
663
O Rose, thou art sick!
The invisible worm
That flies in the night,
In the howling storm,
Has found out thy bed
Of crimson joy:
And his dark secret love
Does thy life destroy.
William Blake
The Sick Rose
666
Children of the future age,
Reading this indignant page,
Know that in a former time,
Love, sweet love, was thought a crime.
William Blake
A Little Girl Lost
701
L’amour vient de l’aveuglement,
L’amitie de la connaissance.
[Love comes from blindness, friendship from knowledge]
Comte de Bussy-Rabutin
Histoire Amoureuse de Gaules
702
L’absence est a l’amour ce qu’est au feu le vent;
Il eteint le petit, il allume le grand.
[Absence is to love what wind is to fire;
it extinguishes the small, it enkindles the great.]
Comte de Bussy-Rabutin
Histoire Amoureuse de Gaules
707
To live is like to love—all reason is against it, and all healthy instinct for it.
Samuel Butler
Note Books
711
In her first passion woman loves her lover,
In all others all she loves is love.
Lord Byron
Don Juan, c.iii, st. 3
716
Friendship is Love without his wings!
Lord Byron
Hours of Idleness. L’Amitie
718
So, we’ll go no more a roving
So late into the night,
Though the heart be still as loving,
And the moon be still as bright.
Lord Byron
So, We’ll Go No More a Roving
719
Though the night was made for loving,
And the day returns too soon,
Yet we’ll go no more a-roving
By the light of the moon.
Lord Byron
So, We’ll Go No More a Roving
726
Odi et amo: quare id faciam, fortasse requiris.
Nescio, set fieri sentio et excrucior.
[I hate and I love: why I do so you may well ask.
I do not know, but I feel it happen and am in agony.]
Catullus
Carmina, lxxxv
730
L’amour, tel qu’il existe dans la societe, n’est que
l’echange de deux fantaisies et le contact de deux
epidermes.
[Love, in the form in which it exists in society, is
nothing by the exchange of two fantasies and the
superficial contact of two bodies.]
Nicolas-Sebastien Chamfort
Maximes et Pensees, ch. 6
746
All thoughts, all passions, all delights,
Whatever stirs this mortal frame,
All are but ministers of Love,
And feed his sacred flame.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Love
758
Heav’n has no rage, like love to hatred turn’d,
Nor Hell a fury, like a woman scorn’d.
William Congreve
The Mourning Bride
774
Love built on beauty, soon as beauty, dies.
John Donne
Elegies
775
Love is a growing or full constant light;
And his first minute, after noon, is night.
John Donne
A Lecture in the Shadow
782
I like a church; I like a cowl;
I love a prophet of the soul;
And on my heart monastic aisles
Fall like sweet strains, or pensive smiles;
Yet not for all his faith can see,
Would I that cowled churchman be.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
The Problem
807
I hate all that don’t love me, and slight all that do.
George Farquhar
The Constant Couple
809
Love and scandal are the best sweeteners of tea.
Henry Fielding
Love in Several Masques
813
Plaisir d’amour ne dure qu’un moment,
Chagrin d’amour dure toute la vie.
[Love’s pleasure lasts but a moment,
love’s sorrow lasts all through life.]
Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian
Celestine
867
Jenny kissed me when we met,
Jumping from the chair she sat in;
Time, you thief, who love to get
Sweets into your list, put that in:
Say I’m weary, say I’m sad,
Say that health and wealth have missed me,
Say I’m growing old, but add,
Jenny kissed me.
Leigh Hunt
Rondeau
881
I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it
for hours. I love to keep it by me: the idea of getting
rid of it nearly breaks my heart.
Jerome K. Jerome
Three Men in a Boat
891
Love is the wisdom of the fool and the folly of the wise.
Samuel Johnson
912
If you can walk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but too much;
Rudyard Kipling
If
949
He may live without books,—what is knowledge but grieving?
He may live without hope,—what is hope but deceiving?
He may live without love,—what is passion but pining?
But where is the man that can live without dining?
Owen Meredith
Lucile
951
After all, my erstwhile dear,
My no longer cherished,
Need we say it was not love,
Just because it perished?
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Passer Mortuus Est
976
Qui finem quaeris amoris,
Cedet amor rebus; res age, tutus eris.
[You who seek an end of love, love will yield to business: be busy, and you will be safe.]
Ovid
Remedia Amoris
978
As the sin that was sweet in the sinning
Is foul in the ending thereof,
As the heat of the summer’s beginning
Is past in the winter of love:
O purity, painful and pleading!
O coldness, ineffably gray!
O hear us, our handmaid unheeding,
And take it away!
Barry Pain
Swinburne
989
"I distinguish the pictureseque and the beautiful, and I
add to them, in the laying out of grounds, a third and
distinct character, which I call unexpectedness."
"Pray, sir," said Mr. Milestone, "by what name do you
distinguish the character, when a person walks round
the grounds for the second time?"
Thomas Love Peacock
Headlong Hall
990
He remembered too late on this thorny green bed,
Much that well may be thought cannot wisely be said.
Thomas Love Peacock
Crotchet Castle
1018
When one is in love, one always begins by deceiving one’s self, and one always ends by deceving others. That is what the world calls a romance.
Oscar Wilde
1023
Between men and women there is no friendship possible. There is passion, enmity, worship, love, but no friendship.
Oscar Wilde
1027
When you love someone all your saved-up wishes start coming out.
Elizabeth Bowen
1028
Friendship often ends in love; but love in friendship—never.
Charles Caleb Colton
1030
It well may be that in a difficult hour,
Pinned down by pain and moaning for release,
Or nagged by want past resolution’s power,
I might be driven to sell your love for peace,
Or trade the memory of this night for food.
It well may be. I do not think I would.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Fatal Interview, xxx
1031
A man reserves his true and deepest love not for the species
of woman in whose company he finds himself electrified and
enkindled, but for that one in whose company he may feel
tenderly drowsy.
George Jean Nathan
1032
Falling in love consists merely in uncorking the
imagination and bottling the common-sense.
Helen Rowland
1034
There is no remedy for love but to love more.
Henry David Thoreau
1043
Now hatred is by far the longest pleasure;
Men love in haste, but they detest at leisure.
Lord Byron
1052
Come to me in the silence of the night;
Come in the speaking silence of a dream;
Come with soft rounded cheeks and eyes as bright
As sunlight on a stream;
Come back in tears,
O memory, hope, love of finished years.
Christina Georgina Rossetti
Echo
1092
For the crown of our life as it closes
Is darkness, the fruit there of dust;
No thorns go as deep as the rose’s,
And love is more cruel than lust.
Time turns the old days to derision,
Our loves into corpses or wives;
And marriage and death and division
Make barren our lives.
Algernon Charles Swinburne
Dolores
1093
For this is Wisdom, to love, to live
To take what fate, or the Gods may give.
To ask no question, to make no prayer,
To kiss the lips and caress the hair,
Speed passion’s ebb as you greet its flow
To have,—to hold—and—in time,—let go!
Laurence Hope
1097
He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong.
W.H. Auden
1101
I have loved many, the more and the few—
I have loved many that I might love you.
Grace Fallow Norton
1105
I want to die while you love me,
While yet you hold me fair,
While laughter lies upon my lips,
And lights are in my hair.
Georgia Douglas Johnson
1111
Love me sweet
With all thou art
Feeling, thinking, seeing;
Love me in the
Lightest part,
Love me in full
Being.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
1112
Love rules the court, the camp, the grove,
And men below, and saints above:
For love is heaven, and heaven is love.
Walter Scott
1115
Rose leaves, when the rose is dead,
Are heaped for the beloved’s bed;
And so thy thoughts, when thou art gone,
Love itself shall slumber on.
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Music, When Soft Voices Die
1116
My love came back to me
Under the November tree
Shelterless and dim.
He put his hand upon my shoulder,
He did not think me strange or older,
Nor I, him.
Frances Cornford
All Souls’ Night
1122
sweet springtime is my time is your time is our time
for springtime
is love time
and viva sweet love.
e.e. cummings
1127
They are not long, the weeping and the laughter,
Love and desire and hate:
I think they have no portion in us after
We pass the gate.
Ernest Dowson
Vitae Summa Brevis Spem Nos Vetat Incohare Longham
1130
Though they go mad they shall be sane.
Though they sink through the sea, they shall rise again.
Though lovers be lost, love shall not,
And death shall have no dominion.
Dylan Thomas
1131
Time does not bring relief; you all have lied
Who told me time would ease me of my pain!
I miss him in the weeping of the rain;
I want him at the shrinking of the tide;
The old snows melt from every mountain-side,
And last year’s leaves are smoke in every lane;
But last year’s bitter loving must remain
Heaped on my heart, and my old thoughts abide.
There are a hundred places where I fear
To go, — so with his memory they brim.
And entering with relief some quiet place
Where never fell his boot or shone his face
I say, "There is no memory of him here!"
And so stand stricken, so remembering him.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Time Does Not Bring Relief
1135
Western wind, when wilt thou blow,
The small rain down can rain?
Christ, if my love were in my arms
And I in my bed again!
1159
And Love! could thou and I with Fate conspire
To grasp this sorry Scheme of Things entire,
Would not we shatter it to bits—and then
Re-mould it nearer to the Heart’s Desire!
Omar Khayyam
Rubaiyat, LXXII, trans. by Edward Fitzgerald (1st ed.)
1170
And this I know: whether the one True Light
Kindle to Love, or Wrath-consume me quite,
One Flash of It within the Tavern caught
Better than in the Temple lost outright.
Omar Khayyam
Rubaiyat, LXXXIII, trans. by Edward Fitzgerald (2nd ed.)
1175
love is a little white bird
and the flight of it so fast
you can’t see it
and you know it’s there
only by the faint whirr of its wings
and the hush song coming so low to your ears
you fear it might be silence
and you listen keen and you listen long
and you know it’s more than silence
for you get the hush song so lovely
it hurts and cuts into your heart
and what you want is to give more than you can get
and you’d like to write it but it can’t be written
and you’d like to sing it but you don’t dare try
because the little white bird sings it better than you can
Carl Sandburg
Little Word, Little White Bird
1177
I have but to continue at your side.
So wanton, light and false, my love, are you,
I am most faithless when I most am true.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnets, x
1178
I would indeed that love were longer-lived,
And oaths were not so brittle as they are,
But so it is, and nature has contrived
To struggle on without a break thus far,—
Whether or not we find what we are seeking
Is idle, biologically speaking.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnets, xi
1180
Wherefore I say: O love, as summer goes,
I must be gone, steal forth with silent drums,
That you may hail anew the bird and rose
When I come back to you, as summer comes.
Else will you seek, at some not distant time,
Even your summer in another clime.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnets, xxvii
1182
This have I known always: Love is no more
Than the wide blossom which the wind assails,
Than the great tide that treads the shifting shore,
Strewing fresh wreckage gathered in the gales:
Pity me that the heart is slow to learn
What the swift mind beholds at every turn.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnets, xxix
1183
And I am made aware of many a week
I shall consume, remembering in what way
Your brown hair grows about your brow and cheek,
And what divine absurdities you say:
Till all the world, and I, and surely you,
Will now I love you, whether or not I do.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnets, xl
1184
Think not for this, however, the poor treason
Of my stout blood against my staggering brain,
I shall remember you with love, or season
My scorn with pity,—let me make it plain:
I find this frenzy insufficient reason
For conversation when we meet again.
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Sonnets, xli
1196
Yet women’s ways are witless ways,
As any sage will tell,—
And what am I, that I should love
So wisely and so well?
Edna St. Vincent Millay
The Philosopher
1198
And why should I be cold, my lad,
And why should you repine,
Because I love a dark head
That never will be mine?
Edna St. Vincent Millay
The Betrothal
1212
I loved you once, nor can this heart be quiet,
For it would seem that love still lingers there,
But do not you be further troubled by it;
I would in no wise hurt you, oh my dear.
Alexander Pushkin
I Loved You Once
1213
I loved you without hope, a mute offender;
What jealous pangs, what shy despairs I knew!
A love as deep as this, as true, as tender,
God grant another may yet offer you.
Alexander Pushkin
I Loved You Once
1215
We only, while around all weary grow,
Unwearied stand,
And midst the fickle changes others konw,
Love—hand in hand.
Sully Prudhomme
The Water’s Edge
1216
Love, if you love me,
Lie next to me.
Be for me, like rain,
The getting out
Of the tiredness, the fatuousness,
The semi-lust of intentional indifference.
Be wet
With a decent happiness.
Robert Creeley
The Rain
1221
I looked and saw your love
In the shadow of your heart,
As a diver sees the perl
In the shadow of the sea;
And I murmured, not above
My breath, but all apart,—
"Ah! you can love, true girl,
And is your love for me?"
Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Three Shadows
1225
My true-love hath my heart, and I have his,
By just exchange one for another given:
I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss,
There never was a better bargain driven:
My true-love hath my heart, and I have his.
Philip Sidney
A Ditty
1226
His heart in me keeps him and me in one,
My heart in him his thoughts and senses guides:
He loves my heart, for once it was his own,
I cherish his because in me it bides:
My true-love hath my heart, and I have his.
Philip Sidney
A Ditty
1227
I throw the apple; if thou love me true
Take it and give what willing maidens do;
But if thy thoughts be other than I pray,
Take’t all the same and think how things decay.
Plato
I Throw the Apple
1235
Ah, clear they see and true they say
That one shall weep, and one shall stray
For such is Love’s unvarying law....
I never thought, I never saw
That I should be the first to go;
How pleasant that it happened so!
Dorothy Parker
Surprise
1236
Into love and out again,
Thus I went, and thus I go.
Spare your voice, and hold your pen—
Well and bitterly I know
All the songs were ever sung,
All the words were ever said;
Could it be, when I was young,
Some one dropped me on my head?
Dorothy Parker
Theory
1239
New love, new love, shall I be forsaken?
One shall go a-wandering, and one of us must sigh.
Sweet it is to slumber, but how shall be awaken—
Whose will be the broken heart, when dawn comes by?
Dorothy Parker
The Last Question
1240
The sun’s gone dim, and
The moon’s turned blak;
For I love him, and
He didn’t love back.
Dorothy Parker
Two-Volume Novel
1242
And why with you, my love, my lord,
Am I spectacularly bored,
Yet do you up and leave me—then
I scream to have you back again.
Dorothy Parker
On Being a Woman
1244
Or had I some poison gas,
I could make the moments pass
Bumping off a number of
People whom I do not love.
Dorothy Parker
Frustration
1245
Hope it was that tutored me,
And Love that taught me more;
And now I learn at Sorrow’s knee
The self-same lore.
Dorothy Parker
Post-Graduate
1247
How shall I wail, that wasn’t meant for weeping?
Love has run and left me, oh, what then?
Dream, then, I must, who never can be sleeping;
What if I should meet Love, once again?
Dorothy Parker
Convalenscent
1248
How shall I be mating
Who have looked above—
Living for a hating,
Dying of a love?
Dorothy Parker
The Dark Girl’s Rhyme
1251
I give her sadness and the gift of pain,
A new moon madness and a love of rain.
Dorothy Parker
The Godmother
1252
There’s little in taking or giving,
There’s little in water or wine;
This living, this living, this living
Was never a project of mine.
Oh, hard is the struggle, and sparse is
The gain of one at the top,
For art is a form of catharsis,
And love is a paremanent flop,
And work is the province of cattle,
And rest’s for a clam in a shell,
So I’m thinking of throwing the battle—
Would you kindly direct me to hell?
Dorothy Parker
Coda
1259
Once, when I was young and true,
Someone left me sad—
Broke my brittle heart in two;
And that is very bad.
Love is for unlucky folk,
Love is but a curse.
Once there was a heart I broke;
And that, I think, is worse.
Dorothy Parker
A Very Short Song
1261
Four be the things I am wiser to know:
Idleness, sorrow, a friend, and a foe.
Four be the things I’d been better without:
Love, curiosity, freckles, and doubt.
Three be the things I shall never attain:
Envy, content, and sufficient champagne.
Three be the things I shall have till I die:
Laughter and hope and a sock in the eye.
Dorothy Parker
Inventory
1262
All of the blundering words I’ve spoken,
Little whilte love, forgive, forgive.
Once you went out, my heart fell, broken.
(Nevertheless, a girl must live.)
Dorothy Parker
Now at Liberty
1267
Love has gone a-rocketing.
That is not the worst;
I could do without the thing,
And not be the first.
Joy has gone the way it came.
That is nothing new;
I could get along the same—
Many people do.
Dorothy Parker
Wail
1268
This is what I vow:
He shall have my heart to keep,
Sweetly will we stir and sleep...
thi sis what I pray:
Keep him by me tenderly;
Keep him sweet in pride of me...
This is what I know:
Lovers’ oaths are thin as rain;
Love’s a harbinger of pain...
Dorothy Parker
Somebody’s Song, extracts
1269
...Swift the measured sands may run;
Love like this is never done;
He and I are welded one:
This is what I vow.
...Keep me from the old distress;
Let me, for our happiness,
Be the one to love the less:
This is what I pray.
...Ever is my heart a-thirst,
Ever is my love accurst;
He is neither last nor first:
This is what I know.
Dorothy Parker
Somebody’s Song, extracts
1271
Let him see your passion is
Ever tenderer than his....
Go and bless your star above,
Thus are you, and thus is Love.
Tender though the love he bore,
You had loved a little more....
Lady, go and curse your star,
Thus Love is, and thus you are.
Dorothy Parker
To a Much Too Unfortunate Lady, extracts
1282
And when, in search of novelty, you stray,
Oh, I can kiss you blithely as you go....
And what goes on, my love, while you’re away,
You’ll never know.
Dorothy Parker
A Certain Lady
1283
My soul is crushed, my spirit sore;
I do not like me any more.
I cavil, quarrel, grumble, grouse.
I ponder on the narrow house.
I shudder at the thought of men....
I’m due to fall in love again.
Dorothy Parker
Symptom Recital
1284
And this, O love, my pitiable plight
Whenever from my circling arms you stray;
This little world of mine has lost its light....
I hope to God, my dear, that you can say
The same to me.
Dorothy Parker
Rondeau Redouble
1286
Woman wants monogamy;
Man delights in novelty.
Love is woman’s moon and sun;
Man has other forms of fun.
WOman lives but in her lord;
Count to ten, and man is bored.
With this the gist and sum of it,
What earthly good can come of it?
Dorothy Parker
General Review of the Sex Situation
1287
Oh, gallant was the first love, and glittering and fine;
The second love was water, in a clear white cup;
The third love was his, and the fourth was mine;
And after that, I always get them all mixed up.
Dorothy Parker
Pictures in the Smoke
1291
So silent I when Love was by
He yawned, and turned away;
But Sorrow clings to my apron-strings,
I have so much to say.
Dorothy Parker
Anecdote
1299
And now I have another lad!
No longer need you tell
How all my nights are slow and sad
For loving you too well.
Dorothy Parker
The Danger of Writing Defiant Verse
1300
Drink and dance and laugh and lie,
Love, the reeling midnight through,
For tomorrow we shall die!
(But, alas, we never do.)
Dorothy Parker
The Flaw in Paganism
1311
Show me a love was done and through,
Tell me a kiss escaped its debt!
Son, to your death you’ll pay your due—
Women and elephants never forget.
Dorothy Parker
Ballade of Unfortunate Mammals
1314
Every love’s the love before
In a duller dress.
That’s the measure of my lore—
Here’s my bitterness:
Would I knew a little more,
Or very much less!
Dorothy Parker
Summary
1321
and eyes big love-crumbs,
and possibly i like the thrill
of under me you so quite new
e.e. cummings
7
1346
To love oneself is the beginning of a life-long romance.
Oscar Wilde
1353
Love is the delightful interval between meeting
a beautiful girl and discovering that she looks
like a haddock.
John Barrymore
1354
The heaviest object in the world is the body
of the woman you have ceased to love.
Marquis de Luc de Clapiers Vauvenargues
1355
A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her.
Oscar Wilde
1388
Love is the delusion that one woman differs from another.
H.L. Mencken
1429
Love loves for ever,
And finds a sort of joy in pain,
And gives with nought to take again,
And loves too well to end in vain:
Is the gain small then?
Love laughs at "never",
Outlives our life, exceeds the span
Appointed to mere mortal man:
All which love is and does and can
Is all in all then.
Christina Georgina Rossetti
1468
Through me you pass into the city of woe:
Through me you pass into eternal pain:
Through me among the people lost for aye.
Justice the founder of my fabric moved:
To rear me was the task of power divine,
Supremest wisdom, and primeval love.
Before me things create were , save things
Eternal, and eternal I shall endure.
All hope abandon, ye who enter here.
Alighieri Dante
The Divine Comedy
1477
Nothing but blackness above
And nothing that moves but the cars...
God, if you wish for our love,
Fling us a handful of stars!
Louis Untermeyer
Caliban in the Coal Mines
1478
The grand essentials of happiness are: something to do, something to love, and something to hope for.
Allan K. Chalmers
1479
We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love on another.
Jonathan Swift
1480
Love can sometimes be magic. But magic can sometimes ... just be an illusion.
Javan
1483
To fall in love is easy, even to remain in it is not difficult; our human loneliness is cause enough. But it is a hard quest worth making to find a comrade through whose steady presence one becomes steadily the person one desires to be.
Anna Louise Strong
1484
The moment you have in your heart this extraordinary thing called love and feel the depth, the delight, the ecstasy of it, you will discover that for you the world is transformed.
J. Krishnamurti
1485
The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly; it is dearness only that gives everything its value. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress and grow brave by reflection. ’Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.
Thomas Paine
1486
There are three things men can do with women: love them, suffer for them, or turn them into literature.
Stephen Stills
1487
Love does not begin and end the way we seem to think it does. Love is a battle, love is a war; love is a growing up.
James Baldwin
1488
To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead.
Bertrand Russell
1489
Love takes off masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we cannot live within.
James Baldwin
1490
Perfect love is rare indeed—for to be a lover will require that you continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the philosopher, the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the fortitude of the cretin.
Leo Buscaglia
1491
Nunc scio quit sit amor.
[Now I know what love is.]
Virgil
1492
I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.
Henry David Thoreau
1497
Is not a kiss the very autograph of love?
Henry Finck
1510
I’ll love you, dear, I’ll love you
Till China and Africa meet,
And the river jumps over the mountain
And the salmon sing in the street.
W.H. Auden
As I Walked Out One Evening
1517
Girls we love for what they are; young men for what they promise to be.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
1522
Escape me?
Never—
Beloved!
While I am I, and you are you,
So long as the world
contains us both,
Me the loving and you
the loth,
While the one eludes, must
the other persue.
Robert Browning
1545
Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love all year round, madam; that is all there is to distinguish us from other animals.
Beaumarchais
1548
I love my hour of wind and light,
I love men’s faces and their eyes,
I love my spirit’s veering flight
Like swallows under evening skies.
Sara Teasdale
Swallow Flight
1588
As you go down the
Stream of life in your
Little canoe, I hope
You will have a jolley
Time, with plenty of
Room for two,
Love is to the human
Heart as sunshine is
To flowers, And friendship
Is the fairest thing in
This cold world of ours.
Thomas Rigdon Foote
Autograph Albums and Bible of Ella Beaver Calhoun
1589
The magic of first love is our ignorance that it can never end.
Benjamin Disraeli
1595
We always deceive ourselves twice about the people we love—first to their advantage, then to their disadvantage.
Albert Camus
1604
Love is an ideal thing, marriage a real thing; a confusion of the real with the ideal never goes unpunished.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
1611
Love is the triumph of imagination over intelligence.
H.L. Mencken
1630
Art is Science in Love.
E.F. Weisslitz
1633
How delicious is the winning
Of a kiss at Love’s beginning.
Thomas Campbell
Song
1635
What is a kiss? Why this, as some approve:
The sure sweet cement, glue, and lime of love.
Robert Herrick
Hesperides
1654
Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.
Albert Einstein
1657
Friendship is love minus sex and plus reason. Love is friendship plus sex and minus reason.
Mason Cooley
1659
A speech is like a love affair. Any fool can start it, but to end it requires considerable skill.
Lord Mancroft
1666
I want to fall in love with him again. I never stopped loving him - I've always loved him and always will - but our life together is verging on monotony. Love can withstand this, but for lust, it's fatal.
Paolo Coelho
Adultery
1667
So she had to satisfy herself with the idea of love - loving the loving of things whose existence she didn't care at all about. Love itself became the object of her love. She loved herself in love, she loved loving love, as love loves loving, and was able, in that way, to reconcile herself with a world that fell so short of what she would have hoped for. It was not the world that was the great and saving lie, but her willingness to make beautiful and fair, to live a once-removed life, in a world once-removed from the one in which everyone else seemed to exist.
Jonathan Safran Foer
Everything is Illuminated
1669
loving
is the most
creative
force in the universe.
the memory of loving,
the most
destructive.
Harold H. Bloomfield
How to Survive the Loss of a Love
1670
But I say to you that when you work you fulfil a part of earth's furthest dream, assigned to you when that dream was born,
And in keeping yourself with labour you are in truth loving life,
And to love life through labour is to be intimate with life's inmost secret.
Kahil Gibran
Prophet
1671
Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and to try to love the questions themselves like locked rooms and like books that are written in a very foreign tongue. Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is, to live everything. Live the questions now. Perhaps you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer.
Rainer Maria Rilke
Letters on Love (Rilke on Love and Other Difficulties)
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news + thoughts

Tabular Data

Tue 11-04-2017
Tabulating the number of objects in categories of interest dates back to the earliest records of commerce and population censuses.

After 30 columns, this is our first one without a single figure. Sometimes a table is all you need.

In this column, we discuss nominal categorical data, in which data points are assigned to categories in which there is no implied order. We introduce one-way and two-way tables and the `\chi^2` and Fisher's exact tests.

Altman, N. & Krzywinski, M. (2017) Points of Significance: Tabular data. Nature Methods 14:329–330.

...more about the Points of Significance column

Happy 2017 `\pi` Day—Star Charts, Creatures Once Living and a Poem

Tue 14-03-2017


on a brim of echo,

capsized chamber
drawn into our constellation, and cooling.
—Paolo Marcazzan

Celebrate `\pi` Day (March 14th) with star chart of the digits. The charts draw 40,000 stars generated from the first 12 million digits.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
12,000,000 digits of `\pi` interpreted as a star catalogue. (details)

The 80 constellations are extinct animals and plants. Here you'll find old friends and new stories. Read about how Desmodus is always trying to escape or how Megalodon terrorizes the poor Tecopa! Most constellations have a story.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Find friends and stories among the 80 constellations of extinct animals and plants. Oh look, a Dodo guardings his eggs! (details)

This year I collaborate with Paolo Marcazzan, a Canadian poet, who contributes a poem, Of Black Body, about space and things we might find and lose there.

Check out art from previous years: 2013 `\pi` Day and 2014 `\pi` Day, 2015 `\pi` Day and and 2016 `\pi` Day.

Data in New Dimensions: convergence of art, genomics and bioinformatics

Tue 07-03-2017

Art is science in love.
— E.F. Weisslitz

A behind-the-scenes look at the making of our stereoscopic images which were at display at the AGBT 2017 Conference in February. The art is a creative collaboration with Becton Dickinson and The Linus Group.

Its creation began with the concept of differences and my writeup of the creative and design process focuses on storytelling and how concept of differences is incorporated into the art.

Oh, and this might be a good time to pick up some red-blue 3D glasses.

BD Genomics 3D art exhibit - AGBT 2017 / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
A stereoscopic image and its interpretive panel of single-cell transcriptomes of blood cells: diseased versus healthy control.

Interpreting P values

Thu 02-03-2017
A P value measures a sample’s compatibility with a hypothesis, not the truth of the hypothesis.

This month we continue our discussion about `P` values and focus on the fact that `P` value is a probability statement about the observed sample in the context of a hypothesis, not about the hypothesis being tested.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Interpreting P values. (read)

Given that we are always interested in making inferences about hypotheses, we discuss how `P` values can be used to do this by way of the Benjamin-Berger bound, `\bar{B}` on the Bayes factor, `B`.

Heuristics such as these are valuable in helping to interpret `P` values, though we stress that `P` values vary from sample to sample and hence many sources of evidence need to be examined before drawing scientific conclusions.

Altman, N. & Krzywinski, M. (2017) Points of Significance: Interpreting P values. Nature Methods 14:213–214.

Background reading

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2017) Points of significance: P values and the search for significance. Nature Methods 14:3–4.

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2013) Points of significance: Significance, P values and t–tests. Nature Methods 10:1041–1042.

...more about the Points of Significance column

Snellen Charts—Typography to Really Look at

Sat 18-02-2017

Another collection of typographical posters. These ones really ask you to look.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Snellen charts designed using physical constants, Braille and elemental abundances in the universe and human body.

The charts show a variety of interesting symbols and operators found in science and math. The design is in the style of a Snellen chart and typset with the Rockwell font.