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Where am I supposed to go? Where was I supposed to know?Violet Indianaget lost in questionsmore quotes

hitchslap: beautiful


In Silico Flurries: Computing a world of snow. Scientific American. 23 December 2017


visualization + design

Christopher Hitchens—Out of Letters

ASCII Art

The images shown here were created as part of my ASCII Art project, which extends ASCII art to include

  • proportionally spaced fonts
  • a variety of font weights in a single image
  • both tone and structure of the image to select characters
  • fixed strings to render an image in legible text

Applying the code to images of Hitchens was motivated by my own deep love of Hitchens and a typographic portrait of Christopher Hitchens, created out of Gill Sans letters by Miles Chic at Capilano University.

This adds to my growing shrines to Hitchens, including Merry Hitchmas! and hitchslap t-shirts.

Christopher Hitchens in Letters and Words

All images are generated using Gotham, with up to 8 weights (Extra Light to Ultra). Each image includes size and characters used for the image. I give the absolute type size, though only useful to know in relative terms to the size of the image and other images drawn with the same method. The color of text in each layer is the same—black— but font weight may vary.

Some images are generated using more than one layer of ASCII. In some cases the characters used in each layer are different.

basic ascii

As the font size is reduced, greater detail and contrast can be achieved.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 43pt set: . x 8 : * @ - \ | _space_ / (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 29pt set: . x 8 : * @ - \ | _space_ / (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 17pt set: . x 8 : * @ - \ | _space_ / (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 11pt set: . x 8 : * @ - \ | _space_ / (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)

By setting the image with a fixed string, such as a short quote or longer body of text, detail is lost but the ASCII representation takes on more meaning.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 11pt set: godisnotgreat (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 29pt set: godisnotgreat (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 11pt set: Hitchslap 11 (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 5 layers (11pt -6deg, 17pt 6deg, 29pt -3deg, 43pt 3deg, 59pt 0deg) set: godisnotgreat (source from Christian Witkin/Twelve/Grand Central Publishing) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 7pt set: . x 8 : * @ - \ | _space_ / (source from Gasper Tringale) (zoom, source)

multi-layered ascii art

Images take on detail when multiple rotated layers of text is used. Each of the images below is composed of more than one layer, starting with a 2-layer image which uses the uppercase alphabet at 0 and 90 degrees.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 2 layers (0deg, 90deg) set: A-Z (source from HBO) (zoom, source)

Meaning can be added to the image by using different text in each layer. In the examples below, I set the same image using the pair "Godisnotgreat" (at 0 degrees) and "religionpoisonseverything" (at 90 degrees). In the second example, I use the unlikely combination of "Jesus" and "Mohammad"—inspired by Jesus and Mo.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 2 layers set: Godisnotgreat. 0deg Relionpoisonseverything. 90deg (source from HBO) (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 2 layers set: Jesus 0deg Mohammad 90deg (source from HBO) (zoom, source)

When rotated layers contain punctuation, very high level of detail can be achieved.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 2 layers set: . : - + * _space_ 0deg / 90deg (zoom, source)

The image below is made out of layers that contain only forward (/) and back (\) slashes.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 2 layers set: \ / (zoom, source)

The image below is made using only the period character in three layers rotated at -45, 0 and 45 degrees. Although the image looks like a pixelated version of the original—it is more than that. It is a typeset representation that uses 8 weights of Gotham. Character spacing between periods is informed by font metrics.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 2 layers set: . (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 2 layers set: 8 X x | ^ : . - = + ' " @ \ / | * ~ , # (source from The Australian) (zoom, source)

hitchens at the podium

The three images below show the difference between using a variety of punctuation characters and setting an image using a block of text. The first image uses "8 X x" and common punctuation.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 11pt set: 8 X x | ^ : . - = + ' " @ \ / | * ~ , # (zoom, source)

I use hitchslap 9 for the first image below, and all the hitchslaps for the second image. When setting an image in using a block of text, the choice of character at any position is fixed and only the font weight is allowed to vary. When the text is relatively short (e.g. hitchslap 9 is 544 characters and is repeated 50 times in the image), rivers of space appear in the image.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 11pt set: Hitchslap 9 (zoom, source)
Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 11pt set: all Hitchslaps (zoom, source)

In both cases, the image is very recognizable.

recursive ascii art

When an image of text is set with the text itself, you have recursive ASCII art. Below is hitchslap 2, set with itself. In the image, the font is Gotham and the text used to asciify the image is also Gotham.

It makes ordinary moral people, compels them, forces them, in some cases orders them do disgusting wicked unforgivable things. There's no expiation for the generations of misery and suffering that religion has inflicted in this way and continues to inflict. And I still haven't heard enough apology for it. — Christopher Hitchens

The quote is 307 characters long and is repeated 391 times in the image.

Christopher Hitchens - ASCII Art / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Christopher Hitchens ASCII Art. method: Gotham font, 8 weights, 11pt set: Hitchslap 2 (source from hitchslap 2) (zoom, source)

In principle, the process of asciifying text with text can be repeated, by using the asciified image as input for asciification with progressively smaller text.

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news + thoughts

Optimal experimental design

Tue 31-07-2018
Customize the experiment for the setting instead of adjusting the setting to fit a classical design.

The presence of constraints in experiments, such as sample size restrictions, awkward blocking or disallowed treatment combinations may make using classical designs very difficult or impossible.

Optimal design is a powerful, general purpose alternative for high quality, statistically grounded designs under nonstandard conditions.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Optimal experimental design. (read)

We discuss two types of optimal designs (D-optimal and I-optimal) and show how it can be applied to a scenario with sample size and blocking constraints.

Smucker, B., Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2018) Points of significance: Optimal experimental design Nature Methods 15:599–600.

Background reading

Krzywinski, M., Altman, N. (2014) Points of significance: Two factor designs. Nature Methods 11:1187–1188.

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Points of significance: Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and blocking. Nature Methods 11:699–700.

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Points of significance: Designing comparative experiments. Nature Methods 11:597–598.

The Whole Earth Cataloguer

Mon 30-07-2018
All the living things.

An illustration of the Tree of Life, showing some of the key branches.

The tree is drawn as a DNA double helix, with bases colored to encode ribosomal RNA genes from various organisms on the tree.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
The circle of life. (read, zoom)

All living things on earth descended from a single organism called LUCA (last universal common ancestor) and inherited LUCA’s genetic code for basic biological functions, such as translating DNA and creating proteins. Constant genetic mutations shuffled and altered this inheritance and added new genetic material—a process that created the diversity of life we see today. The “tree of life” organizes all organisms based on the extent of shuffling and alteration between them. The full tree has millions of branches and every living organism has its own place at one of the leaves in the tree. The simplified tree shown here depicts all three kingdoms of life: bacteria, archaebacteria and eukaryota. For some organisms a grey bar shows when they first appeared in the tree in millions of years (Ma). The double helix winding around the tree encodes highly conserved ribosomal RNA genes from various organisms.

Johnson, H.L. (2018) The Whole Earth Cataloguer, Sactown, Jun/Jul, p. 89

Why we can't give up this odd way of typing

Mon 30-07-2018
All fingers report to home row.

An article about keyboard layouts and the history and persistence of QWERTY.

My Carpalx keyboard optimization software is mentioned along with my World's Most Difficult Layout: TNWMLC. True typing hell.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
TNWMLC requires seriously flexible digits. It’s 87% more difficult than using a standard Qwerty keyboard, according to Martin Krzywinski, who created it (Credit: Ben Nelms). (read)

McDonald, T. (2018) Why we can't give up this odd way of typing, BBC, 25 May 2018.

Molecular Case Studies Cover

Fri 06-07-2018

The theme of the April issue of Molecular Case Studies is precision oncogenomics. We have three papers in the issue based on work done in our Personalized Oncogenomics Program (POG).

The covers of Molecular Case Studies typically show microscopy images, with some shown in a more abstract fashion. There's also the occasional Circos plot.

I've previously taken a more fine-art approach to cover design, such for those of Nature, Genome Research and Trends in Genetics. I've used microscopy images to create a cover for PNAS—the one that made biology look like astrophysics—and thought that this is kind of material I'd start with for the MCS cover.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Cover design for Apr 2018 issue of Molecular Case Studies. (details)