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And whatever I do will become forever what I've done.Wislawa Szymborskadon't rehearsemore quotes

In Silico Flurries: Computing a world of snow. Scientific American. 23 December 2017


language + fiction

Dark Matter of the English Language—the unwords

Words are easy, like the wind;
Faithful friends are hard to find.
—William Shakespeare

unanimals

Critters that definitely don't exist but, perhaps, should.

The backal is probably a feisty biter while the cakmiran probably has a quizzical look. And I would completely avoid the fangol—he sounds like trouble.

A great exercise for kids and the comedic-at-heart would be to try to draw some of these. What would a gakrin look like? Or a gorderish?

Below are the alphabetically first 4–10 letter single-word unanimals for each letter. In some cases, no names of a given length were generated for a given letter.

—4—
aytt
bebe
bick
caen
calb
dalh
dlol
fibl
file
galg
gaon
haen
hale
ilpa
jang
kall
laot
laro
mard
mean
naal
neat
orot
oton
pate
peof
qaid
radc
ranl
saol
shal
tial
walr
weil
—5—
acter
alome
boloo
brata
cabal
capir
dacwo
daxol
fimat
fogon
gatey
geass
haore
heisa
ihire
kardo
kouse
lalpy
lante
malbe
morci
nlreg
nriwe
oacda
omita
paric
ponga
radka
ramep
saage
saako
teart
ufuse
wease
weatl
—6—
acukoe
agtalt
backal
banher
caidat
calepe
dearle
dolpin
eyrita
fangol
gafala
gakrin
haamet
hadnel
iykile
jacang
kagcet
kurdot
lalper
largoz
mamket
mander
narnla
oammim
ooceat
palyus
patble
rarman
ravlil
seaise
seikol
tarbaa
tonele
usrenl
valiss
waatir
whagit
—7—
amreron
apunaed
baadber
balsidd
cadtole
calfasf
daldaug
dalfiso
eolgeal
eomrarf
fondard
gallish
gamymly
hankrer
hokloru
itarato
jatfish
jatwoss
kaister
lamushe
leittoy
madarle
malfash
narddco
nhucasf
oncigut
ootfoto
pakline
parcata
qicsoor
raacbor
raipins
sablrod
sabrilr
tenlrit
tonmede
vansoar
vatkifh
waldfil
walslil
—8—
anlonfow
arnbwict
baieslel
barnnkor
caeffuse
cakmiran
disteale
erhadiol
geepbuwl
golshowo
halalale
hocscist
loicpalt
lruzgind
mannforl
marppuse
obberose
oosgerle
pandleie
perphist
raaldope
ragprerd
saelling
saistiet
tolrfish
valcunle
wadmfish
wasshail
—9—
anlfilher
beigartal
cacdockud
cagccride
gardefand
gorderish
ipilfoyor
keosildor
laechinee
lhallaeye
malpandie
maltreuge
okrerblon
pallanmer
penrhapor
shipopish
shorgeone
ugoflifes
waadarall
waamesder
—10—
asdrosquod
cackemorel
canzlitbar
gaotemtirh
gorofoshew
hirkaflarl
honkerfosh
mapobanadl
moalarfesg
nearretlee
qoarrorule
raccistech
sancockese
sealdhicnh
waagelidhe
weendefish
—11—
condlidilin
cotarleweer
galafonllar
geatingtink
rellswobgry
soridioatar
wolfendelad

Here are all some lists with common suffixes

*ish camfish gallish gawlish gohfish gurrish jatfish mipkish polmish wamfish gorderish shipopish slarmish soulfish tolrfish wadmfish weendefish

*ile halile iykile weadnrile cragiile file gile

*ale anmale calilale disteale halalale hale saale

*use bampuse caeffuse marppuse kouse ufuse

*her banher coocher lorsher anlfilher wher

*tar codtar mistar soridioatar wortautar

*ole rorole cadtole wurkole cole

*ise seaise shoise guceyrise

VIEW ALL

news + thoughts

Optimal experimental design

Tue 31-07-2018
Customize the experiment for the setting instead of adjusting the setting to fit a classical design.

The presence of constraints in experiments, such as sample size restrictions, awkward blocking or disallowed treatment combinations may make using classical designs very difficult or impossible.

Optimal design is a powerful, general purpose alternative for high quality, statistically grounded designs under nonstandard conditions.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Optimal experimental design. (read)

We discuss two types of optimal designs (D-optimal and I-optimal) and show how it can be applied to a scenario with sample size and blocking constraints.

Smucker, B., Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2018) Points of significance: Optimal experimental design Nature Methods 15:599–600.

Background reading

Krzywinski, M., Altman, N. (2014) Points of significance: Two factor designs. Nature Methods 11:1187–1188.

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Points of significance: Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and blocking. Nature Methods 11:699–700.

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Points of significance: Designing comparative experiments. Nature Methods 11:597–598.

The Whole Earth Cataloguer

Mon 30-07-2018
All the living things.

An illustration of the Tree of Life, showing some of the key branches.

The tree is drawn as a DNA double helix, with bases colored to encode ribosomal RNA genes from various organisms on the tree.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
The circle of life. (read, zoom)

All living things on earth descended from a single organism called LUCA (last universal common ancestor) and inherited LUCA’s genetic code for basic biological functions, such as translating DNA and creating proteins. Constant genetic mutations shuffled and altered this inheritance and added new genetic material—a process that created the diversity of life we see today. The “tree of life” organizes all organisms based on the extent of shuffling and alteration between them. The full tree has millions of branches and every living organism has its own place at one of the leaves in the tree. The simplified tree shown here depicts all three kingdoms of life: bacteria, archaebacteria and eukaryota. For some organisms a grey bar shows when they first appeared in the tree in millions of years (Ma). The double helix winding around the tree encodes highly conserved ribosomal RNA genes from various organisms.

Johnson, H.L. (2018) The Whole Earth Cataloguer, Sactown, Jun/Jul, p. 89

Why we can't give up this odd way of typing

Mon 30-07-2018
All fingers report to home row.

An article about keyboard layouts and the history and persistence of QWERTY.

My Carpalx keyboard optimization software is mentioned along with my World's Most Difficult Layout: TNWMLC. True typing hell.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
TNWMLC requires seriously flexible digits. It’s 87% more difficult than using a standard Qwerty keyboard, according to Martin Krzywinski, who created it (Credit: Ben Nelms). (read)

McDonald, T. (2018) Why we can't give up this odd way of typing, BBC, 25 May 2018.

Molecular Case Studies Cover

Fri 06-07-2018

The theme of the April issue of Molecular Case Studies is precision oncogenomics. We have three papers in the issue based on work done in our Personalized Oncogenomics Program (POG).

The covers of Molecular Case Studies typically show microscopy images, with some shown in a more abstract fashion. There's also the occasional Circos plot.

I've previously taken a more fine-art approach to cover design, such for those of Nature, Genome Research and Trends in Genetics. I've used microscopy images to create a cover for PNAS—the one that made biology look like astrophysics—and thought that this is kind of material I'd start with for the MCS cover.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Cover design for Apr 2018 issue of Molecular Case Studies. (details)

Happy 2018 `\tau` Day—Art for everyone

Wed 27-06-2018
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
You know what day it is. (details)

Universe Superclusters and Voids

Mon 25-06-2018

A map of the nearby superclusters and voids in the Unvierse.

By "nearby" I mean within 6,000 million light-years.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
The Universe — Superclustesr and Voids. The two supergalactic hemispheres showing Abell clusters, superclusters and voids within a distance of 6,000 million light-years from the Milky Way. (details)