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mouse veins: exciting



EMBO Practical Course: Bioinformatics and Genome Analysis, 5–17 June 2017.


visualization + design

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Cover image accompanying our article on mouse vasculature development. Biology turns astrophysical. PNAS 1 May 2012; 109 (18) (zoom, PNAS)

Creating the PNAS Cover

One of my goals in life, which I can now say has been accomplished, is to make biology look like astrophysics. Call it my love for the Torino Impact Hazard Scale.

Recently, I was given an opportunity to attend to this (admittedly vague) goal when Linda Chang from Aly Karsan's group approached me with some microscopy photos of mouse veins. I was asked to do "something" with these images for a cover submission to accompany the manuscript.

When people see my covers, sometimes they ask "How did you do that?" Ok, actually they never ask this. But being a scientist, I'm trained me to produce answers in anticipation of such questions. So, below, I show you how the image was constructed.

The image was published on the cover of PNAS (PNAS 1 May 2012; 109 (18))

Tools

Photoshop CS5, Nik Color Efex Pro 4, Alien Skin Bokeh 2 and a cup of coffee from a Rancilio Silvia.

source images

Below are a few of the images I had the option to work with. These are mouse embryonic blood vessels, with a carotid artery shown in the foreground with endothelial cells in green, vascular smooth muscle cells in red and the nuclei in blue.

Of course, as soon as I saw the images, I realized that there was very little that I needed to do to trigger the viewer's imagination. These photos were great!

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Mouse carotid arteries. (zoom)

memories of star trek

Immediately I thought of two episodes of Star Trek (original series): Doomsday Machine and the Immunity Syndrome, as well as of images from the Hubble Telescope.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Enterprise is about to be consumed by a horror tube: a planet killer! (The Doomsday Machine)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Enterprise heads into a giant amoeba. Who eats whom? I'll let you guess. (The Immunity Syndrome)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Orion nebula (M42) as seen by the Hubble telescope. (zoom)

I though it would be pretty easy to make the artery images look all-outer-spacey. They already looked it.

centerpiece image

And then I saw the image below.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
A particularly spectacular image of a mouse carotid artery. I'm thinking 10 on the Torino scale. (zoom)

constructing the cover

background

The background was created from the two images shown here. The second image was sampled three times, at different rotations.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Images used for background. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Images used for background. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Layer composition for background elements. (zoom)

The channel mixer was used to remove the green channel and leave only red and blue.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Background elements for PNAS cover image. (zoom)

middle ground

The next layer was composed of what looked like ribbons of blue gas. This was created by sampling the oval shapes from the source images. Here the red channel was a great source for cloud shapes, and this was the only channel that was kept. The hue was shifted to blue and a curve adjustment was applied to increase the contrast.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
First set of middle ground elements, before adjustments. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
First set of middle ground elements, after channel adjustments. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Second set of middle ground elements. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Layer composition for middle ground elements. (zoom)

When the foreground and middle ground elements were combined, the result was already 40 parsecs away.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Background and foreground elements for PNAS cover image. (zoom)

foreground

The foreground was created from the spectacular comet-like image of a mouse artery. Very little had to be done to make this element look good. It already looked good.

I applied a little blur using Alien Skin's Bokeh 2 to narrow the apparent depth of field, masked out elements at the bottom of the image and removed some of the green channel. The entire blue channel was removed altogether (this gave the tail of the comet a mottled, flame-like appearance).

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Foreground element, before adjustments. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Foreground element, after channel adjustments. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Layer composition for foreground element. (zoom)

post processing

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Initial composition of background, middle ground and foreground elements. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
40% localized application of Nik's Tonal Contrast (Color Efex 4 plugin) to increase structure in red channel. (zoom)
Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
50% blend with Nik's Pro Contrast (Color Efex 4 plugin). (zoom)

And here we have the final image.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Final PNAS cover. Spacey! (zoom)
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news + thoughts

Tabular Data

Tue 11-04-2017
Tabulating the number of objects in categories of interest dates back to the earliest records of commerce and population censuses.

After 30 columns, this is our first one without a single figure. Sometimes a table is all you need.

In this column, we discuss nominal categorical data, in which data points are assigned to categories in which there is no implied order. We introduce one-way and two-way tables and the `\chi^2` and Fisher's exact tests.

Altman, N. & Krzywinski, M. (2017) Points of Significance: Tabular data. Nature Methods 14:329–330.

...more about the Points of Significance column

Happy 2017 `\pi` Day—Star Charts, Creatures Once Living and a Poem

Tue 14-03-2017


on a brim of echo,

capsized chamber
drawn into our constellation, and cooling.
—Paolo Marcazzan

Celebrate `\pi` Day (March 14th) with star chart of the digits. The charts draw 40,000 stars generated from the first 12 million digits.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
12,000,000 digits of `\pi` interpreted as a star catalogue. (details)

The 80 constellations are extinct animals and plants. Here you'll find old friends and new stories. Read about how Desmodus is always trying to escape or how Megalodon terrorizes the poor Tecopa! Most constellations have a story.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Find friends and stories among the 80 constellations of extinct animals and plants. Oh look, a Dodo guardings his eggs! (details)

This year I collaborate with Paolo Marcazzan, a Canadian poet, who contributes a poem, Of Black Body, about space and things we might find and lose there.

Check out art from previous years: 2013 `\pi` Day and 2014 `\pi` Day, 2015 `\pi` Day and and 2016 `\pi` Day.

Data in New Dimensions: convergence of art, genomics and bioinformatics

Tue 07-03-2017

Art is science in love.
— E.F. Weisslitz

A behind-the-scenes look at the making of our stereoscopic images which were at display at the AGBT 2017 Conference in February. The art is a creative collaboration with Becton Dickinson and The Linus Group.

Its creation began with the concept of differences and my writeup of the creative and design process focuses on storytelling and how concept of differences is incorporated into the art.

Oh, and this might be a good time to pick up some red-blue 3D glasses.

BD Genomics 3D art exhibit - AGBT 2017 / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
A stereoscopic image and its interpretive panel of single-cell transcriptomes of blood cells: diseased versus healthy control.

Interpreting P values

Thu 02-03-2017
A P value measures a sample’s compatibility with a hypothesis, not the truth of the hypothesis.

This month we continue our discussion about `P` values and focus on the fact that `P` value is a probability statement about the observed sample in the context of a hypothesis, not about the hypothesis being tested.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Interpreting P values. (read)

Given that we are always interested in making inferences about hypotheses, we discuss how `P` values can be used to do this by way of the Benjamin-Berger bound, `\bar{B}` on the Bayes factor, `B`.

Heuristics such as these are valuable in helping to interpret `P` values, though we stress that `P` values vary from sample to sample and hence many sources of evidence need to be examined before drawing scientific conclusions.

Altman, N. & Krzywinski, M. (2017) Points of Significance: Interpreting P values. Nature Methods 14:213–214.

Background reading

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2017) Points of significance: P values and the search for significance. Nature Methods 14:3–4.

Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2013) Points of significance: Significance, P values and t–tests. Nature Methods 10:1041–1042.

...more about the Points of Significance column