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If you are interested in color, explore my other color tools, Brewer palettes resources, color blindness palettes and math and an exhausting list of 10,000 color names for all those times you couldn't distinguish between tan hide, sea buckthorn, orange peel, west side, sunshade, california and pizzaz.

Designing for Color blindness

Color choices and transformations for deuteranopia and other afflictions

Here, I help you understand color blindness and describe a process by which you can make good color choices when designing for accessibility.

The opposite of color blindness is seeing all the colors and I can help you find 1,000 (or more) maximally distinct colors.

You can also delve into the mathematics behind the color blindness simulations and learn about copunctal points (the invisible color!) and lines of confusion.

Color palettes for color blindness

In this section, I cover how to make good color choices when considering audiences with color blindness.

With the exception of the 8-color palette, all palettes have been created using a process (read below) that tries to maintain perceptual luminance uniformity in color-blind space.

1 · Conservative 8-color palette for colorbliness

This 8-color palette is adapted from Nature Method's Points of View: Color blindness by Bang Wong. Note that in that original source the RGB values listed in the table did not exactly correspond to the RGB swatches—probably an RGB vs CMYK conversion mixup.

This palette is suitable for categorical color encoding—the colors do not, as a whole, have a natural order and none is substantially more salient than another.

You can download these colors as plain text list of HEX and RGB values.

An 8-color palette for color blindness. / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
An 8-color palette for color blindness, adapted from Wong, B. (2011) Nature Methods 8:441. (PDF, plain text)

For more tips about designing with color blindness in mind, see Color Universal Design (CUD) — How to make figures and presentations that are friendly to people with color blindess.

2 · Using color equivalencies

To people with color blindness, some colors appear the same. This equivalence can be used to identify colors that are distinct to those with normal as well as to those with color blindness.

For a given RGB color we can simulate how it would appear to someone with color blindess and identify groups of RGB colors that appear indistinguishable in color blindness.

Color equivalencies in color blindness for protanopia, deuteranopia and tritanopia. / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Many colors appear the same to people with color blindness. This chart shows the colors that are identical (rows) to those with protanopia, deuteranopia (most common) and tritanopia

These equivalencies can be used to construct color palettes—lists of colors that are distinguishable to deuteranopes and those with normal vision.

Since deuteranopia is the most common, this is the condition that I use for color selection.

The exact luminance (perceived brightness) of the simulated color varies depending on the color blindness algorithm. Each row in the squares above should look identical using any color blindness simulation (e.g. Color Oracle, Photoshop, etc) but brightness of the rows may be slightly different than shown here.

3 · 12-color palette for colorbliness

This palette maps four colors onto each of the two color dimensions in deuteranopes and four onto greyscale. This palette is very useful for designing transit and subway maps.

Color names are playful selections from my list of 10,000 color names.

You can download these colors as plain text list of HEX and RGB values.

A 12-color palette for color blindness. / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
A 12 color palette for color blindness that maps onto each of the color dimensions in deuteranopes. Within each set of four, colors also have reasonably similar greyscale tones. Inset swatches show color alternatives that are indistinguishable from the main swatch for deuternopes. (PDF, plain text)

4 · 15-color palette for colorbliness

You can download these colors as plain text list of HEX and RGB values.

A 15-color palette for color blindness. / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
A 15-color palette for color blindness. (PDF, plain text)

5 · 24-color palette for colorbliness

Even more color choices for color blindess, including colors that map onto greys. For these, I don't have RGB/HEX values handy.

You can download these colors as plain text list of HEX and RGB values.

15-color palettes for color blindness / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
15-color palettes designed for each of the three types of color blindness: deuteranopia, protanopia and tritanopia. Palettes are shown as they appear to someone with normal vision as well as to someone affected with each of the three types of color blindness. Each palette contains three groups of swatches, matching to two of the color channels and greys. Within each group colors in the same row map onto the same color. (PDF)

6 · The last word on color palettes for colorbliness

You can create your own color palettes using the figure below.

For a given color blindness type (e.g. deuteranopia) and channel (e.g. blue), the rows represent reasonably uniform steps in LCH luminance of the simulated color and a rich (high chroma) simulation at that luminance.

The last word on color palettes for color blidness. / Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Color ramps of 16–19 colors for each color channel for each color blidness type. Color ramps show RGB colors and their color blindness simulation grouped by channels (e.g. greys, blues, yellow). Within a channel, colors are sorted in increasing and roughly equal steps of LCH luminance of the simulated color. At a given luminance, the RGB color whose simulation has the highest chroma is used. (PDF)
news + thoughts

Regression modeling of time-to-event data with censoring

Mon 21-11-2022

If you sit on the sofa for your entire life, you’re running a higher risk of getting heart disease and cancer. —Alex Honnold, American rock climber

In a follow-up to our Survival analysis — time-to-event data and censoring article, we look at how regression can be used to account for additional risk factors in survival analysis.

We explore accelerated failure time regression (AFTR) and the Cox Proportional Hazards model (Cox PH).

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Regression modeling of time-to-event data with censoring. (read)

Dey, T., Lipsitz, S.R., Cooper, Z., Trinh, Q., Krzywinski, M & Altman, N. (2022) Points of significance: Regression modeling of time-to-event data with censoring. Nature Methods 19.

Music video for Max Cooper's Ascent

Tue 25-10-2022

My 5-dimensional animation sets the visual stage for Max Cooper's Ascent from the album Unspoken Words. I have previously collaborated with Max on telling a story about infinity for his Yearning for the Infinite album.

I provide a walkthrough the video, describe the animation system I created to generate the frames, and show you all the keyframes

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Frame 4897 from the music video of Max Cooper's Asent.

The video recently premiered on YouTube.

Renders of the full scene are available as NFTs.

Gene Cultures exhibit — art at the MIT Museum

Tue 25-10-2022

I am more than my genome and my genome is more than me.

The MIT Museum reopened at its new location on 2nd October 2022. The new Gene Cultures exhibit featured my visualization of the human genome, which walks through the size and organization of the genome and some of the important structures.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
My art at the MIT Museum Gene Cultures exhibit tells shows the scale and structure of the human genome. Pay no attention to the pink chicken.

Annals of Oncology cover

Wed 14-09-2022

My cover design on the 1 September 2022 Annals of Oncology issue shows 570 individual cases of difficult-to-treat cancers. Each case shows the number and type of actionable genomic alterations that were detected and the length of therapies that resulted from the analysis.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
An organic arrangement of 570 individual cases of difficult-to-treat cancers showing genomic changes and therapies. Apperas on Annals of Oncology cover (volume 33, issue 9, 1 September 2022).

Pleasance E et al. Whole-genome and transcriptome analysis enhances precision cancer treatment options (2022) Annals of Oncology 33:939–949.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
My Annals of Oncology 570 cancer cohort cover (volume 33, issue 9, 1 September 2022). (more)

Browse my gallery of cover designs.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
A catalogue of my journal and magazine cover designs. (more)

Survival analysis—time-to-event data and censoring

Fri 05-08-2022

Love's the only engine of survival. —L. Cohen

We begin a series on survival analysis in the context of its two key complications: skew (which calls for the use of probability distributions, such as the Weibull, that can accomodate skew) and censoring (required because we almost always fail to observe the event in question for all subjects).

We discuss right, left and interval censoring and how mishandling censoring can lead to bias and loss of sensitivity in tests that probe for differences in survival times.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Survival analysis—time-to-event data and censoring. (read)

Dey, T., Lipsitz, S.R., Cooper, Z., Trinh, Q., Krzywinski, M & Altman, N. (2022) Points of significance: Survival analysis—time-to-event data and censoring. Nature Methods 19:906–908.


© 1999–2022 Martin Krzywinski | contact | Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences CentreBC Cancer Research CenterBC CancerPHSA