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design: fun



Bioinformatics and Genome Analysis Course. Izmir International Biomedicine and Genome Institute, Izmir, Turkey. May 2–14, 2016


art + science

Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference — San Francisco, 2013

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Design loves science and science loves design, but doesn't always know it. (Bloomberg Businessweek)

science design

Together with Alberto Cairo, I presented at the Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference (highlights) on the topic of design and communication in the sciences.

Alberto, as the journalist, motivated why communication should include access to detail through an engaging narrative. He made the distinction between the specialist (heavy on detail) and the communicator (focus on narrative) and emphasized that the distinction is artificial, though often played out (watch video).

I, as the scientist, underscored the importance of clear communication between scientists. As the specialists, they are often very poor communicators. Pick up any science journal and you'll quickly discover that scientists either aren't good at telling stories or are discouraged to do so by the medium. The consequence is the same: papers read like a wall of text. TL;DR anyone? The quality of visual communication in general ranges from muddled to abysmal (watch video).

We need more leaders in the field, such as Nature Publishing Group, to reward and emphasize good visual communication (e.g. Nature Cancer Review 2013 Figure Calendar).

Our presentations concluded with a 15 minute moderated discussion with Sam Grobart, senior Businesssweek writer. Everyone got a little cheeky. Good fun.

presentation video

Watch: my presentation, conversation with Alberto Cairo, moderated by Sam Grobart. (Bloomberg TV), Albert Cairo's presentation.

presentation slides

This was a lightning 7 minute talk. I did more planning about what to say than I usually do, given that there was virtually no opportunity for any kind of backtracking, and include a running narrative below each slide.

Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
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download presentation

My slides are available as PDF, keynote (zipped) or Quicktime. The format is 16:9 HD.

Bloomberg Businessweek Design Issue

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
The reality of redesign is disruptive. How can we pursue new ideas and opportunities without leaving consumers confused or angry? Businessweek puts that question to some of the world's most accomplished designers. (Bloomberg Businessweek Design Issue)

On 28 Jan 2013, Bloomberg Businessweek Design Issue will capture the ideas from the conference and the personalities that generated them.

During the conference, each talk was captured in a series of sketches by Tom Wujec: my talk sketch and moderated discussion sketch.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Date completed: ongoing — an accurate assessment of the state of the visual communication field in science. (read article)

news + thoughts

Bayesian networks

Sun 30-08-2015

This month we continue with the theme of Bayesian statistics and look at Bayesian networks, which combine network analysis with Bayesian statistics.

In a Bayesian network, nodes represent entities, such as genes, and the influence that one gene has over another is represented by a edge and probability table (or function). Bayes' Theorem is used to calculate the probability of a state for any entity.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Bayesian networks. (read)

In our previous columns about Bayesian statistics, we saw how new information (likelihood) can be incorporated into the probability model (prior) to update our belief of the state of the system (posterior). In the context of a Bayesian network, relationships called conditional dependencies can arise between nodes when information is added to the network. Using a small gene regulation network we show how these dependencies may connect nodes along different paths.

Background reading

Puga, J.L, Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2015) Points of Significance: Bayesian Statistics Nature Methods 12:277-278.

Puga, J.L, Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2015) Points of Significance: Bayes' Theorem Nature Methods 12:277-278.

...more about the Points of Significance column

Unentangling complex plots

Fri 10-07-2015

The Points of Significance column is on vacation this month.

Meanwhile, we're showing you how to manage small multiple plots in the Points of View column Unentangling Complex Plots.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of View column: Unentangling complex plots. (download, more about Points of View)

Data in small multiples can vary in range, noise level and trend. Gregor McInerny and myself show you how you can deal with this by cropped and scaling the multiples to a different range to emphasize relative changes while preserving the context of the full data range to show absolute changes.

McInerny, G. & Krzywinski, M. (2015) Points of View: Unentangling complex plots. Nature Methods 12:591.

...more about the Points of View column

Fixing Jurassic World science visualizations

Fri 10-07-2015

The Jurassic World Creation Lab webpage shows you how one might create a dinosaur from a sample of DNA. First extract, sequence, assemble and fill in the gaps in the DNA and then incubate in an egg and wait.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
We can't get dinosaur genomics right, but we can get it less wrong. (a) Corn genome used in Jurassic World Creation Lab website. Image is from the Science publication B73 Maize Genome: Complexity, Diversity, and Dynamics. Photo and composite by Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment. (b) Random data on 8 chromosomes from chicken genome resized to triceratops genome size (3.2 Gb). Image by Martin Krzywinski. (c) Actual genome data for lizard genome, UCSC anoCar2.0, May 2010. Image by Martin Krzywinski. Triceratops outline in (b,c) from wikipedia.

With enough time, you'll grow your own brand new dinosaur. Or a stalk of corn ... with more teeth.

What went wrong? Let me explain.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Corn World: Teeth on the Cob.

Printing Genomes

Tue 07-07-2015

You've seen bound volumes of printouts of the human reference genome. But what if at the Genome Sciences Center we wanted to print everything we sequence today?

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Curiously, printing is 44 times as expensive as sequencing. (details)

Gene Volume Control

Thu 11-06-2015

I was commissioned by Scientific American to create an information graphic based on Figure 9 in the landmark Nature Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes paper.

The original figure details the relationships between more than 100 sequenced epigenomes and genetic traits, including disease like Crohn's and Alzheimer's. These relationships were shown as a heatmap in which the epigenome-trait cell depicted the P value associated with tissue-specific H3K4me1 epigenetic modification in regions of the genome associated with the trait.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Figure 9 from Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes (Nature (2015) 518 317–330). (details)

As much as I distrust network diagrams, in this case this was the right way to show the data. The network was meticulously laid out by hand to draw attention to the layered groups of diseases of traits.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Network diagram redesign of the heatmap for a select set of traits. Only relationships with –log P > 3.9 are displayed. Appears on Graphic Science page in June 2015 issue of Scientific American. (details)

This was my second information graphic for the Graphic Science page. Last year, I illustrated the extent of differences in the gene sequence of humans, Denisovans, chimps and gorillas.