Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca - contact me Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca on Twitter Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca - Lumondo Photography Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca - Pi Art Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca - Hilbertonians - Creatures on the Hilbert Curve
Mad about you, orchestrally.Hooverphonicfeel the vibe, feel the terror, feel the painmore quotes

design: beautiful



EMBO Practical Course: Bioinformatics and Genome Analysis, 5–17 June 2017.


art + science

Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference — San Francisco, 2013

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Design loves science and science loves design, but doesn't always know it. (Bloomberg Businessweek)

science design

Together with Alberto Cairo, I presented at the Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference (highlights) on the topic of design and communication in the sciences.

Alberto, as the journalist, motivated why communication should include access to detail through an engaging narrative. He made the distinction between the specialist (heavy on detail) and the communicator (focus on narrative) and emphasized that the distinction is artificial, though often played out (watch video).

I, as the scientist, underscored the importance of clear communication between scientists. As the specialists, they are often very poor communicators. Pick up any science journal and you'll quickly discover that scientists either aren't good at telling stories or are discouraged to do so by the medium. The consequence is the same: papers read like a wall of text. TL;DR anyone? The quality of visual communication in general ranges from muddled to abysmal (watch video).

We need more leaders in the field, such as Nature Publishing Group, to reward and emphasize good visual communication (e.g. Nature Cancer Review 2013 Figure Calendar).

Our presentations concluded with a 15 minute moderated discussion with Sam Grobart, senior Businesssweek writer. Everyone got a little cheeky. Good fun.

presentation video

Watch: my presentation, conversation with Alberto Cairo, moderated by Sam Grobart. (Bloomberg TV), Albert Cairo's presentation.

presentation slides

This was a lightning 7 minute talk. I did more planning about what to say than I usually do, given that there was virtually no opportunity for any kind of backtracking, and include a running narrative below each slide.

Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
Martin Krzywinski - Bloomberg Businessweek Design Conference 2013
1/32

download presentation

My slides are available as PDF, keynote (zipped) or Quicktime. The format is 16:9 HD.

Bloomberg Businessweek Design Issue

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
The reality of redesign is disruptive. How can we pursue new ideas and opportunities without leaving consumers confused or angry? Businessweek puts that question to some of the world's most accomplished designers. (Bloomberg Businessweek Design Issue)

On 28 Jan 2013, Bloomberg Businessweek Design Issue will capture the ideas from the conference and the personalities that generated them.

During the conference, each talk was captured in a series of sketches by Tom Wujec: my talk sketch and moderated discussion sketch.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Date completed: ongoing — an accurate assessment of the state of the visual communication field in science. (read article)
VIEW ALL

news + thoughts

`k` index: a weightlighting and Crossfit performance measure

Wed 07-06-2017

Similar to the `h` index in publishing, the `k` index is a measure of fitness performance.

To achieve a `k` index for a movement you must perform `k` unbroken reps at `k`% 1RM.

The expected value for the `k` index is probably somewhere in the range of `k = 26` to `k=35`, with higher values progressively more difficult to achieve.

In my `k` index introduction article I provide detailed explanation, rep scheme table and WOD example.

Dark Matter of the English Language—the unwords

Wed 07-06-2017

I've applied the char-rnn recurrent neural network to generate new words, names of drugs and countries.

The effect is intriguing and facetious—yes, those are real words.

But these are not: necronology, abobionalism, gabdologist, and nonerify.

These places only exist in the mind: Conchar and Pobacia, Hzuuland, New Kain, Rabibus and Megee Islands, Sentip and Sitina, Sinistan and Urzenia.

And these are the imaginary afflictions of the imagination: ictophobia, myconomascophobia, and talmatomania.

And these, of the body: ophalosis, icabulosis, mediatopathy and bellotalgia.

Want to name your baby? Or someone else's baby? Try Ginavietta Xilly Anganelel or Ferandulde Hommanloco Kictortick.

When taking new therapeutics, never mix salivac and labromine. And don't forget that abadarone is best taken on an empty stomach.

And nothing increases the chance of getting that grant funded than proposing the study of a new –ome! We really need someone to looking into the femome and manome.

Dark Matter of the Genome—the nullomers

Wed 31-05-2017

An exploration of things that are missing in the human genome. The nullomers.

Julia Herold, Stefan Kurtz and Robert Giegerich. Efficient computation of absent words in genomic sequences. BMC Bioinformatics (2008) 9:167

Clustering

Wed 31-05-2017
Clustering finds patterns in data—whether they are there or not.

We've already seen how data can be grouped into classes in our series on classifiers. In this column, we look at how data can be grouped by similarity in an unsupervised way.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Clustering. (read)

We look at two common clustering approaches: `k`-means and hierarchical clustering. All clustering methods share the same approach: they first calculate similarity and then use it to group objects into clusters. The details of the methods, and outputs, vary widely.

Altman, N. & Krzywinski, M. (2017) Points of Significance: Clustering. Nature Methods 14:545–546.

Background reading

Lever, J., Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2016) Points of Significance: Logistic regression. Nature Methods 13:541-542.

Lever, J., Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2016) Points of Significance: Classifier evaluation. Nature Methods 13:603-604.

...more about the Points of Significance column

What's wrong with pie charts?

Thu 25-05-2017

In this redesign of a pie chart figure from a Nature Medicine article [1], I look at how to organize and present a large number of categories.

I first discuss some of the benefits of a pie chart—there are few and specific—and its shortcomings—there are few but fundamental.

I then walk through the redesign process by showing how the tumor categories can be shown more clearly if they are first aggregated into a small number groups.

(bottom left) Figure 2b from Zehir et al. Mutational landscape of metastatic cancer revealed from prospective clinical sequencing of 10,000 patients. (2017) Nature Medicine doi:10.1038/nm.4333