Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca - contact me Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca on Twitter Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca - Lumondo Photography Martin Krzywinski / Genome Sciences Center / mkweb.bcgsc.ca - Hilbertonians - Creatures on the Hilbert Curve
Tango is a sad thought that is danced.Enrique Santos Discépolothink & dance

phi: fun


More than Pretty Pictures—Aesthetics of Data Representation, Denmark, April 13–16, 2015


visualization + design

download

numbers.tgz
1,000,000 digits of π, φ, e and ASN.

buy artwork

All the artwork can be purchased from Fine Art America.

buy Martin Krzywinski's work

← art(π,φ,e)

accidental similarity number

The accidental similarity number is a kind of overlap between numbers. I came up with this concept after creating typographical art about the 4ness of π.

To construct this number for π, φ and e we first write the numbers on top of each other and then identify positions for which the numbers have the same digit.

3.1415926535897932 … 21170679821 … 10270193852 … 
1.6180339887498948 … 93911374847 … 08659593958 … 
2.7182818284590452 … 51664274274 … 32862794349 … 

These digits are then used to create the accidental similarity number. In thise case,

0.979 …

By definition, the decimal is held in place.

accidental similarity art

The poster shows the accidental similarity number for π, φ and e created from the first 1,000,000 digits of each number. There are 9,997 positions in which these numbers have the same digit, but only 9,996 are shown because the distance between positions is used to color the digit and I was limited by input files with 1M digits.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca buy artwork
The accidental similarity number for π, φ and e created from the first 1,000,000 digits of each number. (PNG, BUY ARTWORK)

The distribution of distances follows a Poisson distribution with an average of 100, with about 1-1/e values being smaller than 100.

The font is Neutraface Slab Display Medium.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Segments of π, φ and e are connected by thin links if the same digit is shared between two numbers, and thick links if among all three. Shown for the first 10,000 digits. (PNG)

properties of the accidental similarity number

Any properties are accidental, but curiously ASN(π, φ, e) ≈ 1.

If you find other curiously accidental properties, let me know.

data files

Download the first 9,997 digits of the accidental similarity number. This file provides the ASN digit index, the digit and the position from which it is sampled.

other number art

I came up with Accidental Similarity Number immediately after creating this poster of the overlap between π, φ and e.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca buy artwork
The overlap between the three interesting numbers π, φ and e (nixie theme). (PNG, BUY ARTWORK)

This thought stream started with the 4ness of π.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca buy artwork
The 4ness of π — a measure of how similar each 4 is to its neighbours. (read more, BUY ARTWORK)

news + thoughts

Split Plot Design

Tue 03-03-2015

The split plot design originated in agriculture, where applying some factors on a small scale is more difficult than others. For example, it's harder to cost-effectively irrigate a small piece of land than a large one. These differences are also present in biological experiments. For example, temperature and housing conditions are easier to vary for groups of animals than for individuals.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column: Split plot design. (read)

The split plot design is an expansion on the concept of blocking—all split plot designs include at least one randomized complete block design. The split plot design is also useful for cases where one wants to increase the sensitivity in one factor (sub-plot) more than another (whole plot).

Altman, N. & Krzywinski, M. (2015) Points of Significance: Split Plot Design Nature Methods 12:165-166.

Background reading

1. Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Points of Significance: Designing Comparative Experiments Nature Methods 11:597-598.

2. Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Points of Significance: Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and blocking Nature Methods 11:699-700.

3. Blainey, P., Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Points of Significance: Replication Nature Methods 11:879-880.

...more about the Points of Significance column

Color palettes for color blindness

Tue 03-03-2015

In an audience of 8 men and 8 women, chances are 50% that at least one has some degree of color blindness1. When encoding information or designing content, use colors that is color-blind safe.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
A 12-color palette safe for color blindness

Points of Significance Column Now Open Access

Tue 10-02-2015

Nature Methods has announced the launch of a new statistics collection for biologists.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Nature Methods Points of Significance column is now open access. (column archive)

As part of that collection, announced that the entire Points of Significance collection is now open access.

This is great news for educators—the column can now be freely distributed in classrooms.

...more about the Points of Significance column

Before and After—Designing Tiny Figures for Nature Methods

Tue 13-01-2015

I've posted a writeup about the design and redesign process behind the figures in our Nature Methods Points of Significance column.

I have selected several figures from our past columns and show how they evolved from their draft to published versions.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Fig 2 from Points of Significance: Nested designs. (Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Nature Methods 11:977-978.) (...more)

Clarity, concision and space constraints—we have only 3.4" of horizontal space— all have to be balanced for a figure to be effective.

Martin Krzywinski @MKrzywinski mkweb.bcgsc.ca
Fig 2c (excerpt) from Points of Significance: Designing comparative experiments. (Krzywinski, M. & Altman, N. (2014) Nature Methods 11:597-598.) (...more)

It's nearly impossible to find case studies of scientific articles (or figures) through the editing and review process. Nobody wants to show their drafts. With this writeup I hope to add to this space and encourage others to reveal their process. Students love this. See whether you agree with my decisions!